Courses

 

Course title: English Literature. Restoration and Enlightenment

Tutor: Yordan Kosturkov

 

Mode of delivery: lectures and seminars

Course place and status within the program

Core Subject

Competence expectations

The students recognize the advent of Modernity and its literary genres

Aims and objectives of the course

Increase students’ competence and knowledge of the social-political history of England and the central literary figures of the period

Weekly organization of topics & reading assignments

1 wk Restoration
2 wk Restoration Prose and Drama
3 wk Restoration Comdy
4 wk Restoration lyric and epic poetry
5 wk Enlightenment
6 wk Enlightenment Poetry: Pope and his circle
7 wk Enlightenment Prose
8 wk Swift and Defoe
9 wk Fielding
10 wk Richardson
11 wk Smollett
12 wk Sterne
13 wk The Romancers
14 wk Gothic
15 wk Drama of the Enlightenment

Course requirements

Students shall read principal works of the writers of the period and shall submit 3 essays before sitting the final examination

Mode of assessment

Written Project Work

Bibliography

Core readings:

Evans, I., A Short History of English Literature
Ford, B. (ed.), The Pelican Guide to English Literature (Vol. 3-7) (Penguin Books)
Mincoff, M., A History of English literature (Parts 1 & 2) (Naouka i Izkustvo, 1974)
Rogers, Pat (ed.), The Oxford Illustrated History of English Literature (OUP, 1990)

The general bibliography for the course includes:

Daiches, D. A., A Critical History of English Literature (Secker & Warburg, 1975)
Sampson, G., The Concise Cambridge History of English Literature
Frye, N., Anatomy of Criticism (Penguin, 1990)
Richetti, J., Cambridge Companion to the Eighteenth-Century Novel (CUP, 1996)
Schmidt, J. (ed.)., What Is Enlightenment? (University of California Press, 1996)
Watt, I. The Rise of the Novel (University of California Press, 1957)
The Oxford Anthology of English Literature (Vol. 2-4)
The Norton Anthology of English literature (Vol. 1-2)

 

 

 

Course title: Translation Studies

 Tutor: Yordan Kosturkov

Mode of delivery: lectures and seminars

Course place and status within the program

Core Subject

Competence expectations

The students are introduced to  the genres and techniques of translation

Aims and objectives of the course

Understand and practice techniques of translation and

Weekly organization of topics & reading assignments

1 wk. Literary Translation
2 wk. Literary Translation
3 wk. Translation of Prose Fiction
4 wk. Translation of Poetry
5 wk. Translation of Drama
6 wk. Translation of Film
7 wk. Translation for the Media
8 wk. Escort Interpreting
9 wk. Consecutive Translation
10 wk. Consecutive Translation
11 wk. Simultaneous Translation
12 wk. Simultaneous Translation
13 wk. Translation of Technical, Social and Political, Business, Economic and Legal Literature
14 wk. Working with Dictionaries and Reference
15 wk. Virtual Translation

Course requirements

Students shall become acquainted with the principal genres of translation and specific techniques and shall practice in simulated situations

Mode of assessment

Written Project Work

Bibliography

Core readings:

Holmes J.  (ed.) РEssays in the Theory and Practice of Literary Translation
Nida –ē. A., Ch. Taber – The¬†Theory and Practice of Translation

 

The general bibliography for the course includes:

Bassnett-McGuire S.  РTranslation Studies
Brislin R.  (ed.) РTranslation: Applications and Research
Brower R.  (ed.) РOn Translation
Cary E.  РLa traduction dans le monde moderne
Catford J. A.  РA Linguistic Theory of Translation
Garvin P.  РOn Machine Translation
Nida E. A.  РToward a Science of Translating
Postgate J. P.  РTranslation and Translations. Theory and Practice
Rose M.  (ed.) РTranslation Spectrum. Essays in Theory and Practice

 

 

 

Course title: British Cultural Studies

Tutor: Yordan Kosturkov

Mode of delivery: lectures and seminars

Course place and status within the program

Core Subject

Competence expectations

The students recognize the cultural diversity of Britain

Aims and objectives of the course

Increase students’ competence and knowledge of British life and its impact on British culture

Weekly organization of topics & reading assignments

1 wk. Geography
2 wk. History
3 wk. History
4 wk. History
5 wk. Scotland
6 wk. Wales
7 wk. Northern Ireland and Cornwall
8 wk. The Government
9 wk. Education
10 wk. Holidays
11 wk. Holidays
12 wk. Holidays
13 wk. Eminent Brits
14 wk. The Media
15 wk. The Economy

Course requirements

Students shall become acquainted with the British cultural context and shall identify it in works of literature, in film, periodicals, Internet

Mode of assessment

Written Project Work

Bibliography

Core readings:

Oakland, John. British Civilization: an Introduction. (Deopartmental Library). http://projectbritain.com/

The general bibliography for the course includes:

Morgan, Dave. 1989, –ź Short History of the British People.¬†Leipzig.
Morgan, K. O. (ed.), The Oxford Illustrated History of Britain (OUP, 1983).
Trevelyan, G. M. A., A Shortened History of England (Penguin, 1942).
Upstall, Michael (Ed.). 1993, –Ęh–Ķ Hutchinson Paperback¬†Encyclopedia. Helicon.
Internet Sources: http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/
http://www.visitbritain.com/en/About-Britain/

 

 

 

Course title: American Literary Studies

Tutor: Yordan Kosturkov

Mode of delivery: lectures and seminars

Course place and status within the program

Core Subject

Competence expectations

The students are introduced to a survey of American Literature

Aims and objectives of the course

Increase students’ competence and knowledge of US literature and its impact on American and world culture

Weekly organization of topics & reading assignments

1 wk. Introduction. Historical Background. Periods. The Colony (1607-1776).

Native American Literature. 18c. Poetry: Philip Freneau. American Romanticism. 18c. Prose: Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Paine, Charles Brockden Brown

2 wk. American Romanticism. 19c. Prose. James Fenimore Cooper, Washington Irving. 19c Poetry: Henry Longfellow, John Greenleaf Whittier, Edgar Alan Poe. Transcendentalism. Brook Farm: Emerson, Thoreau, Nathanael Hawthorne

3 wk. New Vistas in Poetry: Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson. Turn of the Century Poetry: Edgar Lee Masters, Carl Sandberg, Amy Lowell

4 wk. 19c Prose: Edgar Alan Poe, Harriet Beecher Stowe, William Dean Howells.

Local Color. Francis Bret Harte, Mark Twain. End of the Century Prose: Herman Melville, Henry James

5 wk. Turn of the Century Prose: Frank Norris, O. Henry, Upton Sinclair, Hamlin Garland, Stephan Crane, Jack London

6 wk. Prose Fiction of the 1920s: Theodore Dreiser, Edith Wharton, Willa Cather, Sherwood Anderson. Post WW1 Novel: Harry Sinclair Lewis, John Dos Passos, Gertrude Stein, Henry Miller

7 wk. The Novel: William Faulkner, Francis Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway

8 wk. 20c Poetry: Robert  Frost, Nicholas Vachel Lindsay, e. e, cummings, Ezra Pound, Thomas Stearns Eliot, William Carlos Williams. Post WW2 Poetry: Allen Ginsberg, Gregory Corso, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Sylvia Plath, Theodor Roethke, John Ashbery, William Meredith, Adrienne Rich. Afro-American Poets: Langston Hughes, Countee  Cullen, Leroi Jones/Amiri Baraka

9 wk. Drama. Eugene O’Neil, Lillian  Hellman, Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams, William Inge, Edward Albee, Arthur Kopit, Sam Shepard

10 Р11 wk. The Novel from 1930s till the 1960s: John Steinbeck, Thomas Wolfe, Richard Wright, Saul Bellow, Carson McCullers, James Baldwin, Truman Capote, James Jones, Jack Kerouac, Norman Mailer, JD Salinger, Gore Vidal

12 Р13 wk. The Novel after the 1960s. Postmodernism: Bernard Malamud, Kurt Vonnegut, Ray Bradbury, John Cheever, Philip Roth, Joseph Heller, William Styron, John Updike, Joyce Carol  Oates, Thomas Pynchon, John Barth, Toni Morrison, Don De Lillo, Donald Barthelme, Anne Beattie, William Burroughs, Richard Brautigan, E. L. Doctorow

14 Р15 wk. US Literature at the Turn of the Millennium: Raymond Carver, Robert Coover, William H. Gass, Ursula K. Le Guin, Bobbie Ann Mason, Susan Minot, Tim O’Brien, Amy Tan, Alice Walker, William Gibson, Ishmael Reed, William Gass, Gloria Anzaldua, Leslie Marmon Silko, Kathy Acker, Paul Auster, Maxine Hong Kingston

 

Course requirements

Students shall become acquainted with the principal authors of American Literature and their work

Mode of assessment

Written Project Work

Bibliography

Core readings:

Bradbury, Malcolm. The Modern American Novel. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1983.
Cunliffe, Marcus, ed. American Literature to 1900: Penguin History of Literature. 
London: Penguin Books, 1993.
Lewicki, Zbignew, ed. A Handbook of American Literature. Warsaw: University of  Warsaw.[1994].
Ruland, Richard and Malcolm Bradbury. From Puritanism to Postmodernism: A History of American Literature. New York: Penguin Books, 1992.
Sage, Lorna. The Cambridge Guide to¬†Women’s Writing in English. Cambridge Univ. Press, 1999.
Van Spanckeren, Kathryn. An Outline of  American Literature. USIA, 1994.

 

The general bibliography for the course includes:

Abrams, M. H. A Glossary of Literary Terms. Fort Worth: Harcourt Brace College Publishers, 1999.
Eagleton, Terry. Literary Theory: An Introduction. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, 1998.
Fowler, R., ed. A Dictionary of Modern Critical Terms. London and New York: Routledge and Kegan Paul. 1987.

 

 

Course title: American Modernism

 

Tutor: Yordan Kosturkov

Mode of delivery: lectures and seminars

Course place and status within the program

Core Subject

Competence expectations

The students are introduced to a survey of American Modernism

Aims and objectives of the course

Increase students’ competence and knowledge of Modcxernism and more specifically American Modernism

Weekly organization of topics & reading assignments

1 Р3 wk. Prose Fiction of the 1920s: Edith Wharton, Willa Cather, Sherwood Anderson. Post WW1 Novel: Harry Sinclair Lewis, John Dos Passos, Gertrude Stein, Henry Miller

4 Р6 wk. The Novel: William Faulkner, Francis Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway

7 Р9 wk. 20c Poetry: Robert  Frost, Nicholas Vachel Lindsay, e. e, cummings, Ezra Pound, Thomas Stearns Eliot, William Carlos Williams. Post WW2 Poetry: Allen Ginsberg, Gregory Corso, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Sylvia Plath, Theodor Roethke, John Ashbery, William Meredith, Adrienne Rich. Afro-American Poets: Langston Hughes, Countee  Cullen, Leroi Jones/Amiri Baraka

10 Р12 wk. Drama. Eugene O’Neil, Lillian  Hellman, Arthur Miller,
Tennessee Williams, William Inge, Edward Albee, Arthur Kopit, Sam Shepard

13 Р15 wk. The Novel from 1930s till the 1960s: John Steinbeck, Thomas Wolfe, Richard Wright, Saul Bellow, Carson McCullers, James Baldwin, Truman Capote, James Jones, Jack Kerouac, Norman Mailer, JD Salinger, Gore Vidal

Course requirements

Students shall become acquainted with the principal authors of American Modernist Literature and their work

Mode of assessment

Written Project Work

Bibliography

Core readings:

Bradbury, Malcolm. The Modern American Novel. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1983.

Ruland, Richard and Malcolm Bradbury. From Puritanism to Postmodernism: A

History of American Literature. New York: Penguin Books, 1992.

Sage, Lorna. The Cambridge Guide to¬†Women’s Writing in English. Cambridge Univ. Press, 1999.

VanSpanckeren, Kathryn. An Outline of  American Literature. USIA, 1994.

 

The general bibliography for the course includes:

Abrams, M. H. A Glossary of Literary Terms. Fort Worth: Harcourt Brace College Publishers, 1999.

Eagleton, Terry. Literary Theory: An Introduction. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, 1998.

Fowler, R., ed. A Dictionary of Modern Critical Terms. London and New York: Routledge and Kegan Paul. 1987.

 

 

 

Course title: American Postmodern Studies

 

Tutor: Yordan Kosturkov

Mode of delivery: lectures and seminars

Course place and status within the program

Core Subject

Competence expectations

The students are introduced to a American Postmodernism

Aims and objectives of the course

Increase students’ competence and knowledge of US literature and its impact on American and world culture

Weekly organization of topics & reading assignments

1 ‚Äď 5 wk. The Novel from 1930s till¬†the 1960s: John Steinbeck, Thomas Wolfe, Richard Wright, Saul Bellow, Carson¬†McCullers, James Baldwin, Truman Capote, James Jones, Jack Kerouac, Norman¬†Mailer, JD Salinger, Gore Vidal

6 ‚Äď 10 wk. The Novel after the¬†1960s. Postmodernism: Bernard Malamud, Kurt Vonnegut, Ray Bradbury, John¬†Cheever, Philip Roth, Joseph Heller, William Styron, John Updike, Joyce¬†Carol¬† Oates, Thomas Pynchon, John¬†Barth, Toni Morrison, Don De Lillo, Donald Barthelme, Anne Beattie, William¬†Burroughs, Richard Brautigan, E. L. Doctorow

11- 15 wk. US Literature at the Turn of the Millennium: Raymond Carver, Robert Coover, William H. Gass, Ursula K. Le Guin, Bobbie Ann Mason, Susan Minot, Tim O’Brien, Amy Tan, Alice Walker, William Gibson, Ishmael Reed, William Gass, Gloria Anzaldua, Leslie Marmon Silko, Kathy Acker, Paul Auster, Maxine Hong Kingston

 

Course requirements

Students shall become acquainted with the principal authors of American Postmodern Literature and their work

Mode of assessment

Written Project Work

Bibliography

Core readings:

Lewicki, Zbignew, ed. A Handbook of American Literature. Warsaw: University of  Warsaw.[1994].

Ruland, Richard and Malcolm Bradbury. From Puritanism to Postmodernism: A

History of American Literature. New York: Penguin Books, 1992.

Sage, Lorna. The Cambridge Guide to¬†Women’s Writing in English. Cambridge Univ. Press, 1999.

VanSpanckeren, Kathryn. An Outline of  American Literature. USIA, 1994.

 

The general bibliography for the course includes:

Abrams, M. H. A Glossary of Literary Terms. Fort Worth: Harcourt Brace College Publishers, 1999.

Eagleton, Terry. Literary Theory: An Introduction. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, 1998.

Fowler, R., ed. A Dictionary of Modern Critical Terms. London and New York: Routledge and Kegan Paul. 1987.

 

 

 

 

Course title: British Postmodern Studies

Tutor: Yordan Kosturkov

Mode of delivery: lectures and seminars

Course place and status within the program

Core Subject

Competence expectations

The students are introduced to a survey of British Postmodern Literature

Aims and objectives of the course

Increase students’ competence and knowledge of British literature

Weekly organization of topics & reading assignments

1 wk. Agatha Christie РA Pocket Full of Rye
2 wk. Agatha Christie РDeath on the Nile
3 wk. Angela Carter РNights at the Circus
4 wk. Anita Brookner РThe Next Best Thing
5 wk. A. S.  Byatt РPossession
6 wk. Bernard Maclaverty РThe Anatomy School
7 wk. Christopher Isherwood РGoodbye to Berlin
8 wk. Ian McEwan РEnduring Move
9 wk. Iris Murdoch РA Fairly Honourable Defeat
10 wk. Monica Ali РBrickmane
11 wk. Salman Rushdie РFury
12 wk. Sebastian Faulks РOn Green Dolphin Street
13 wk. William Boyd РAny Human Heart
14-15 wk. Detective fiction 

♦ Horror fiction
♦ Romance novel
♦ Science fiction and fantasy
♦ Western fiction
♦ Lovecraftianism

 

Course requirements

Students shall become acquainted with the principal authors of British Postmodern Literature and their work

Mode of assessment

Written Project Work

Bibliography

Core readings:

McHale, Brian (1987) Postmodernist Fiction. London: Routledge, (ISBN 0-4150-4513-4)

McHale, Brian. Postmodernist¬†Fiction. London: Routledge, 1987 and “Constructing
Postmodernism” New York: Routledge, 1992).

 

The general bibliography for the course includes:

Eagleton, Terry. Literary Theory: An Introduction. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, 1998.

Fowler, R., ed. A Dictionary of Modern Critical Terms. London and New York: Routledge and Kegan Paul. 1987.

Lewis, Barry. Postmodernism and¬†Literature // ‘The Routledge Companion to Postmodernism. NY: Routledge, 2002.

Hutcheon, Linda. A Poetics of Postmodernism: History, Theory, Fiction.
NY: Routledge, 2004.

Barthes, Roland. The Pleasure of the Text (1975), Hill and Wang: New York.

Writing Degree Zero (1968), Hill and Wang: New York.

Foucault, Michel. This is Not a Pipe. University of California Press, 1983.

Jameson, Fredric (1991) Postmodernism, or, the Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism (ISBN 0-8223-1090-2) Lyotard, Jean-François (1984)

The Postmodern Condition: A Report on Knowledge (ISBN 0-8166-1173-4)

— (1988). The Postmodern Explained:¬†Correspondence 1982-1985. Ed. Julian Pefanis and Morgan Thomas. (ISBN¬†0-8166-2211-6)

 

  

Course title: Creative Writing

 

Tutor: Yordan Kosturkov

Mode of delivery: lectures and seminars

Course place and status within the program

Core Subject

Competence expectations

The students are introduced to Creative Writing and Novel Techniques

Aims and objectives of the course

Increase students’ competence and knowledge and develop their specific writing skills

Weekly organization of topics & reading assignments

1 ‚Äď 3 wk. How to write a novel
4 wk. Yoyur title
5 ‚Äď 6 wk. Your plot
7 wk. Your dialogue
8 wk. Your characters
9 wk. Introduction
10 wk. Ending
11 wk. Language
12 wk. Practice 1
13 wk. Practice 2
14 wk. Practice 3
15 wk. Practice 4

Course requirements

Students will be introduced to techniques of novel writing as well as general instruction in Creative Writing and their work

Mode of assessment

Written Project Work

Bibliography

Core readings:

Barth, John. “Can It Be Taught?”¬†Further Fridays: Essays, Lectures, and Other Nonfiction, 1984-94. Boston:¬†Little, Brown, 1995. 22-34. Print.
Bradbury, Malcolm. “The Bridgeable Gap: Bringing Together the Creative Writer
and the Critical Theorist in an Authorless World.” TLS¬†¬† (Jan.¬†1992): 7-9. Print.
Gordimer, Nadine. “The Essential Gesture: Writers and¬†Responsibility.” The Granta 15 1985: 137-50. Print.
Lodge, David. “Creative Writing: Can It/Should It Be Taught?”¬†Practice of Writing. New York: Penguin, 1997. 171-78. Print.

The general bibliography for the course includes:

Abbs, Peter. A Is for Aesthetic: Essays on Creative Writing and Aesthetic Education. New York: Falmer Press, 1989. Print.
Lim, Shirley Geok-lin. “Lore, Practice, and Social Identity in Creative¬†Writing Pedagogy: Speaking with a Yellow Voice?” Pedagogy 10 1 (Winter¬†2010): 79-93. Print.
—. “The Strangeness of Creative Writing: An Institutional Query.”
Pedagogy 3 2: 151-69. Print.
Perloff, Marjorie. “Creative Writing‚Äô among the Disciplines.”¬†MLA Newsletter 38 1 (Spring 2006): 3-4. Print.
Wojciechowska, Maia. “What I Teach in Creative Writing Classes.”¬†The Writer 100 7 (Jul. 1987): 5-6. Print.

 

 

 

 


–>